Author Archives: Caren

Sounding/Working Papers

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Sounding/Working Papers was a performative sound translation of printed work from Caren Florance’s Reading Spaces exhibition, presented as part of You Are Here Festival 2017. Reuben Ingall treated Working Papers: torrent (Florance/Gardner) as a graphic score, transcribing sections with a computer keyboard, and using the density of printed marks on the page as a guide to the speed of his typing. His homebrewed software treated each key pressed as an instruction to play tones, sample the gallery’s ambience (including typing noises), or remix its own output. This release is an unedited live recording of the performance, made on 8th April 2017 at East Space, Queen Elizabeth Terrace, ACT.

Limited to twenty copies each of three different covers. Art by Caren Florance and words by Angela Gardner from Working Papers: torrent (2015-17). Includes unlimited streaming of Sounding/Working Papers via the free Bandcamp app, plus high-quality download in MP3, FLAC and more.

See more here

Reading Spaces: artists’ books, poetry and poetics

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Detail from ‘Working Papers’, Caren Florance & Angela Gardner, 2015-17.

Reading Spaces is my final PhD exhibition. It features collaborative artists’ books and other print-performed poetry, predominantly produced using handset letterpress. Poets involved include Angela Gardner, Melinda Smith, Owen Bullock, Sarah Rice, and many more.

5–12 April 2017
East Space, Commonwealth Place, Lake Burley Griffin foreshore, Parkes. 
Open every day 12-5pm
Opening: 6pm, 5 April

Associated one-day symposium at the University of Canberra:
Poetry and the Artist’s Book
7 April, 10:30am-3:30pm 
Speakers TBA
After the symposium there will be a guided visit to the Reading Spaces exhibition.
For more details see here

ALSO PARTICIPATING IN THE 2017 YOU ARE HERE FESTIVAL with an exciting translation performance by Rueben Ingall. Stay tuned! 

Watch this space, this space and that space for more details.

Material Poetics (2016)

Material Poetics
Australian National Capital Artists (ANCA) Gallery, 24 August – 11 September 2016.
Caren Florance, Nicci Haynes, UK Frederick & Katie Hayne, Sarah Rice, Jen Webb, Jordan Williams.

Catalogue available to read here.

This work is the first of my created ‘reading spaces’. Gallery visitors are encouraged to sit and handle the books with clean hands.

reading-space

touching/reading/touch is a small series of publications that demand physical engagement rather than the receptive separation usually required in a gallery. Each piece explores its own production and invites the reader to be curious and interactive.

The physical distance of making is one of time and place, yet here we are, you and I, sharing the experience of touch.

table_room
touching/reading/touch 
books

1 Touch to Activate (2015).
Letterpress & offset ink on paper.

2 Mark (2009).
Letterpress on paper, sewn.

3 Swipe (2015).
Photocopy on paper, hand-sewn.

4  Touch 00100000 (2016). Typewritten paper, coil binding, jar, tweezers.

Catalogue statement:  

Material poetics is, as usual, a matter of translation and context.

Poet Charles Bernstein says ‘Poetics is the continuation of poetry by other means’ (1992: 160); so too, material poetics is the con­tinuation of materiality towards other meanings.

Every discipline has its own perspective on what materiality means to its work. Writers think about the various applications of material words to form metaphors. They also riff upon the material processes of writing: pencils, pens, keyboards, screens, fingertips.

Visual arts and craft disciplines – when they are resisting pure optical­ity – work with ‘direct engagement with specific material properties’ (Adam­son 2007: 39), which means foregrounding the qualities that belong to that particular material: e.g., the heavy softness of lead; the fluidity of paint; the bite of acid; the clarity of glass. These elements can be explored/resisted/expanded on a purely physical level, but when you add an exploration of what associative meanings can be embedded in a  material, then we are moving closer to the way writers think, and closer to material poetics.

Not only is lead heavy and soft: it lines caskets; prevents x-ray vision; forms printable letters; draws a line. It has connotations and associations, different for everyone according to their experience and understanding.

These contextual associations can become building blocks, allowing the material/s to carry/project/represent the artists’ desires in a way that (hopefully) offers further possibilities for the viewer/reader/audience to find their own message.

Messages change over time, and the ‘familiar’ can never be taken for granted. Material poetics is two-pronged: it is performing Heidegger’s ‘thingness of the thing’, and it is embuing the thingness with one’s own knowledge of its context and history to tease out new connections. It is performance, spectacle, dialogue, negotia­tion and degustation all rolled into one.

Review of Material Poetics by Jacqui Malins

Owen Bullock/me/Louise Curham: Tracer/YAH (2015-16)

Last year I made a simple yet (I think) interesting chapbook for/with NZ poet Owen Bullock, who is a fellow HDR student at the University of Canberra. We called it Tracer. It has a distinctive shape: tall and narrow, c. 280 x 100mm, using cartridge paper and a grey Optix card cover, laserprinted. To give it a personal touch, I hand-sew each copy with a pamphlet stitch in black thread.

The year before, I’d printed one of Owen’s poems as a page-fold format, initially as a contribution to the deluxe folio of Parenthesis: , Autumn 2014. He’d written this poem during the 2014 Codex Australia symposium; it is a mash-up of quotes, overheard conversations and his own observational haiku. I wanted to send something to the journal that used poetry differently, but because I had to print about 170 pieces, it had to be light (to send to the US) and not too tricky to print, because I was busy with many projects. (I forgot to tell myself that it should be not too tricky to hand-set.) With Owen’s permission, I edited the poem down and took out all the quotes from named theorists and anything that really anchored it to that time and place, leaving it more airy and universal, but retained his first and last haiku, which spoke of his arrival and departure from Melbourne. I used Whitetrace, an architectural tracing paper, to allow translucency and show-through, to allow the words to interact.

I wanted to really utilize the page-fold, to make something that was dimensional. When I’d finished, and sent it off, and had time to really look at it, I saw that this simple folded piece of paper was a complete artist’s book, because it was able to be read in multiple directions.

&Dk_Redex

So. The chapbook, Tracer, contains the original Redex poem, and a subsequent version, called Redux, written by Owen while reading my print. That is, he looked AT the print, turning it over in his hands, and composed a new version from what he saw. He also wrote another piece called ‘On the first arrangement of ‘Redex’, which ends:

What I wrote before
was different

Then, following those, is another poem called ‘On the final arrangement of ‘Redex’. This time, he’s riffing on the experience of the entire process, and random notes that didn’t make it into the original version. I set this poem spacially across both pages of that long thin page spread. Other poems in the chapbook read normatively, straight down each page, but there are at least two poems that read across, and the trick is to indicate that for the reader in the layout so that they don’t get lost. One method I used (for the Redex poem) was to run the title across both pages. The other method was to run a line of arrows across the page spread next to the title, with one returning arrow at the end, so: >>>>>>>>>><
I think it works.

I have other plans for Owen, and one of them involved projection, but I hadn’t resolved how: a large sheet of white paper mounted from above, with his words projecting as a moving animation? Print the words first, then project more over the top? Perhaps have Owen standing between the paper and the projection, and photograph/record him reciting through the movement? He’s a very open, transparent person, and the thought of continuing to use transparency with his words is very appealing.

Early this year, I was approached by another HDR student, Louise Curham, who does a lot of collaborative work around archives and technology. Her technological equipment of choice is film, specifically Super-8 film and projection cameras. She works with film the way I work with letterpress: as a way of exploring what it can do as a material process, rather than as a nostalgic/iconic method of production. You can see her work here and here.

Louise regularly contributes to the Canberra You Are Here festival, and this year she was interested in collaborating with Owen and I in a performance. When she talked about her projection work, I was reminded of my ideas about projecting on to Owen. A project was born.

Tracer became the working name of our collaboration; we threw it in to our proposal, and by the time we wanted to change it, the festival program was out and it seemed to be as good as anything else. It was a fantastic experience, discussing our respective approaches to our creative practice, working out how to use them in a complementary way, and to foreground their material elements without overshadowing each other.

You can see our process in photos at our tumblr.

Essentially, I letterpress-printed words on large sheets of paper (cut off the roll), we hung these and Owen performed to them while Louise projected her films on the paper. That’s the short story.

The words were initially brainstormed by the group, led by Owen who is the wordsmith. They were words that could be pulled apart and pushed together; words of place and time.

The paper was tested by us all: we ended up with both glossy and matte papers because of the different effects they caused. The sheets were so large that I set up all the text sideways on my proof press and hand-rolled them with ink, laying the paper over the type across the bed of the press and printing by using the palm of my hand to press the paper to the type. By rolling roughly and randomly and pressing without really looking, the words formed their own clusters, and bits of the press were inked up and became part of the visuals. The bearer rails made a lovely series of stuttering lines that visually echoed the stutter of the projectors, and I kept printing them as a motif through the text, along with the onomatopoeic letters TATATATATA. My first sheet was too busy, so I set that aside (it’s turning into a book at the moment) and started to leave more space, to allow room for Owen and the films.

press_setup3

Owen and Louise, in the meantime, worked out a running programme of the Super-8 films and a script of haiku to go with them. For the first few times we got together to eat/talk/play, he let the backdrops and the films suggest poems (his head is FULL of them) and then things started to solidify into a set performance.

We didn’t rehearse it intricately; one agreement was that the performance was a chunk of the research. Another agreement was that the difficulties and affects of our process were part of the performance, and not to be treated as obstacles. The sound of the projectors; film getting stuck and melting (alarmingly!); the weather conditions on the night (windy!); whether I could remember my cue to stop being a stagehand and start printing onto a backdrop and Owen by hand (I didn’t, I was early, but we were ok with that). My ‘live’ printing was partly to be present in the action, but also to contribute extra sensory moments on top of the projector sound: the smell of the ink, the hiss of a roller, the added semiotics of placing an X on the projected bus stop at the place where Owen was describing his waiting for the bus, and then printing the X again, directly on him.

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We performed on the 13th of April, after dark, in the courtyard of the Canberra Museum and Gallery, to a crowd that fit into the venue: enough to feel seen, not enough to crowd us. It was windy, the papers were restless, and I had to put weights on their bases (letterpress leading and bulldog clips) and then stand behind and ‘calm’ them during the performance so that they didn’t fly up.

perform1Owen performed engagingly, reciting his haiku in the traditional manner: not in boring poetry voice, but repeating them after a pause, so that you heard them, and then heard them.

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Louise wrangled the four projectors with a savage concentration that was almost scary. When I commented upon this later, she laughed and said that she’d been thinking like a projector. This shone a light into my own head. I so often think like a press: each press I use needs to become familiar, because they each have their own quirks, but once those quirks are known, I can think like them, know how they will react, and adjust my behaviour accordingly. It’s not mastery, it’s empathy.

We had originally thought of repeating this performance in another venue, perhaps for a conference. It may still happen, but suddenly the year has become dense and sticky, with little room to move sideways. We are writing about our experience, because that’s all it needs to be: an experience.

Lou_Owen_160321

Photographer Mark Nolan, Chalk Studio.

Be Spoken For, 2014

Bespoke: Design for the People
Museum of Australian Democracy, Canberra
November 14, 2014 to November 2015.

bespoke

 

In collaboration with Craft ACT: Craft and Design Centre and the Museum of Australian Democracy, five artists have responded to the furniture that was designed for the people who worked in and visited Parliament House. Focusing on the designs, craftsmanship, details, materials and signs of use, the artists have taken a fresh look at the rich heritage of our furniture collection.

 

signsPhotographer Mark Nolan, Chalk Studio.

BE SPOKEN TO is a text-based site-specific installation which engages in a playful way with the eight wooden signs in the MoAD ‘Sign Room’ at Old Parliament House. It has two elements: a ‘companion’ cluster of eight signs, and a wall-hung framed poem. Continue reading

EASS Broad Gallery

A gallery of images by my EASS Broad residents, including process shots and work from their broader practice displayed in the 2013 exhibition. All works are for sale, prices are listed below.

Continue reading

100% Books: the exhibition

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100% Books by Canberra Artists was an exhibition of artists’ books at the Watson Arts Centre in Canberra, ACT, from 11–28 April, 2013. It was opened by arts writer Peter Haynes. It was curated by Caren Florance (Ampersand Duck) and was independently produced by Maryann Mussared and Caren Florance.

The show featured twenty Canberra artists who have made books as part of their broader artistic practice. Each artist has been asked to show an ‘early’ work and a ‘recent’ work. This gap may be only a few years in the case of the emerging artists, but may also be decades, and in some cases the change in visual approach is startling.

ANTONIA AITKEN :: G W BOT ::  BYRD :: KIRSTEN FARRELL :: DIANNE FOGWELL :: U K FREDERICK :: SHELLAINE GODBOLD :: INGEBORG HANSEN :: NICCI HAYNES :: JAN HOGAN :: HANNA HOYNE :: MURRAY KIRKLAND :: MARYANN MUSSARED :: TANYA MYSHKIN :: PATSY PAYNE :: BERNIE SLATER :: FRANKI SPARKE :: NICK STRANKS :: GENEVIEVE SWIFTE :: IONA WALSH

Associated events
There were artist’s talks at 1:30pm on each Saturday of the show: 13 and 20 April. Each Saturday afternoon the curator hosted a white-gloves show-through of the books. On 13 April there was a zine workshop led by artist Bernie Slater with the theme of ‘So you’ve decided to vote for Tony Abbott’. The resulting zine was sold at the zine fair and is now available through the artist. On 20 April there was a small zine fair with some books artists joining in with their works.

More information
The short blurb goes:
Canberra has a long and prolific history of artistic book production, encouraged and inspired by our rich array of cultural and creative institutions. There is a vibrant community of artists who use the book form to explore and extend their broader practice, whether it be printmaking, sculpture or any other medium. This exhibition, featuring a range of work from fine press to street press, is both snapshot and survey of a selection of current practitioners. It promises to be a very special glimpse at Canberra’s other book scene.

The longer blurb (the media release) is here to download.

An article by Caren Florance on curating the show has been published in The Blue Notebook, Volume 8, no. 1, October 2013.

Please see the exhibition album for gallery views and works from each artist.